And Midnight Never Come Featured in The Washington Post

The reception to And Midnight Never Come has been overwhelmingly positive, we are pleased to say. Fans and enthusiasts of Hugh Lamb’s work, and of the genre in general, have been extremely supportive of the posthumous anthology.

This week saw the book mentioned in none other than The Washington Post! Michael Dirda, the newspaper’s weekly book reviewer, published an article recommending 9 books for your Christmas reading pleasure. We all know that Christmas is the time for ghost stories and Michael Dirda’s suggestions didn’t disappoint.

Here’s what he had to say about And Midnight Never Come:

‘And Midnight Never Come,’ edited by Hugh Lamb and Richard Lamb (Kingsbrook Publishing)

The late Hugh Lamb’s anthologies — “Victorian Nightmares,” “Terror by Gaslight” and a dozen others — are treasured by aficionados of the weird, in part for Lamb’s informative introductions to each story. This fall, Richard Lamb discovered that his father’s papers comprised enough unused material to make up this posthumous collection, a typical Lambian assortment of writers who are forgotten (F. Sartin Pilleau, E.R. Suffling), half-forgotten (Hume Nisbet, Alice Perrin) and vaguely familiar (William Hope Hodgson).

In “Waxworks,” by André de Lorde, a debonair young man who claims to be without fear, agrees to pass the night alone in a wax museum. This is never a good idea. In “Behind the Wall,” by Violet Jacob, a pair of staring eyes, glimpsed through a chink in some ancient masonry, presages a wronged — and long dead — woman’s revenge: “You’ve kept me here for twenty years, but you won’t be able to keep me back — not then. I’ll come for you.”

Thank you for the mention, Michael!

In addition to this, the article was referenced in The Spectator as part of Micah Mattix’s roundup of the week’s literary news.

All in all, it has been a great week for Hugh Lamb’s legacy.

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